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Category Archives: Audio

The Ride – Let’s Get Some Audio

The Ride is a personal experience game about how it feels to ride. And being a personal experience game – what better audio than the sounds that my own motorbike actually makes?

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Tonight I met up with the three audio students that agreed to work on the ride with me.

AshChrisJohan

We discussed a few ideas of what positions the mic’s could be in to record the best audio with the least amount of wind, loaded me up with different mics and set me off to ride. The best mic ended up being the last one we tried which was taped to the inside of my jacket – completely protected from wind.

I never thought I’d be riding a motorbike while strapped up with mics – especially to record audio for a game I’m making. This blog is just – here’s a thing we did. It was something out of the ordinary, and it was a really worthwhile. The experience alone and getting to work some people who are in a different discipline, but share the same enthusiasm and passion for what we do. Unfortunately the project was so short for me, the audio guys said this would be a project they would love to have a few months on.

Edit: Chris did a vlog on some of the audio stuff we did for the ride.

Game dev makes me feel like spongebob:

Spongebob Dance.gif

Until next time –

FeenikxFire

Nic

 
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Posted by on September 27, 2016 in Audio, Game Dev, Games, Uncategorized

 

Transmutation: New Audio Feedback

In a previous blog post I mentioned that Transmutation needed more feedback, especially audio.

More Audio feedback.JPG

Since that blog post, I have in fact added:

  • A new 2 minute audio sound until the elevator arrives.
  • Make a player say “Two minutes until the elevator arrives, we can survive for that long can’t we?”
  • Every time the elevator moves down a floor, it dings.
  • Audio feedback for when players are taking damage. They use the proper audio students ugh sounds. Plus i also added a mutant bite sound, so when they deal the damage, it sounds like they’re taking a big chomp out of the player.
  • When the player hits a mutant, The mutant also plays the audio students ugh sounds. And when the weapon (be it Ham, pots, or broom) hits a mutant the correct weapon sound is played.
  • Some more radioactive audio feedback as well as some more UI visual feedback.

Some different audio feedback to let the players know what’s going on. Like when they have enough radiation to move faster or are almost dead it will play some audio to let them know “I can’t take much more” or “I feel different”. All of the sounds are now half way between a 2D sound and a 3D sound. It’s so they can hear it in the direction it’s coming from but loud enough at all times so they can hear it.

Quite a few of the tracks (apart from the female voice) I’ve altered to make the characters sound different. I used Audacity to record and edit these sounds. The elevator audio sounds have been edited to have no bass, full treble, changed the pitch from my own voice to about 15% higher, and then make the speed about 15% faster to make it sound the way it does. The static sounding speaker voice.

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Some of the player voice pitch has been changed to more bass and less treble, a slower speed and a lower pitch to make it sound like they’re not my own voice, and then when they’re even more radiated, sound more like mutants or alter from their original voice.


 

White Skulls - Rad Handle.JPG

I also changed the UI slider bar to have the Radiation symbol as the handle that slides along with the value of the current radiation. Added three different skull images that get filled vertically with the value of the players radiation to provide more feedback that radiation will kill you. The UI slider bar also flashes yellow for a second when the player takes damage from being attacked or stands in radioactive goop.

Until next time –

FeenikxFire

Nic

 
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Posted by on August 26, 2016 in Audio

 

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Transmutation: Audio

For Transmutation – I recorded some audio for certain things. Some ow sounds for mutants and players, an elevator will arrive sound/s, some menu bips when selecting or changing buttons and sourced an elevator ding sound.

To get the Audio for the menu bips to play. Inside the method code that runs when the button is pressed – it plays a random bip sound.

PlayRandomBip

Source PlayRandomBip

But I also wanted a way to play a random bip sound when changing between buttons. After some research I found out that buttons have an event trigger – on Select, and on Deselect are the ones I wanted. When the event system knows that this is the selected object. It will run the events that I parse into it. In this case, on Select is – Activate a highlight behind the button and PlayRandomBipSound(). On Deselect is to just deactivate the highlight behind and not to play another bip sound. Because changing from one button to another is always going to require one Deselect and one Select event call. If both Select and Deselect had PlayRandomBipSound() it would play two sounds every time a change of button occurs.

For a small fraction of time I used one of my previous tracks that I made as a placeholder Main Menu track, and the main Game scene had my placeholder background track for quite a while. I used the audio source Play On Awake and Loop for the background music.

Main Menu BGM

All of these were only placeholder until the audio students sounds were complete. Or at a stage for us to implement. Although there was a short list of audio in our asset list to give them examples of the sounds we were looking for, Ash Ball and Chris Ware went above and beyond.

 

The Background music that we ended up using for the Main Menu – Game Scene – Game Over scene was this track: The intensity of the music changes over time, and we can set the intensity within our game itself so the background music will loop on the appropriate intensity. The intensity of the game increases with each playable characters radiation becoming greater and greater.

There is a unity attachment called FMOD that allowed us to connect to the background music and change the intensity. I’m not familiar with FMOD at all currently, one of the programmers Pritish on my team set it up and implemented the sounds through it. Theres still a few more sounds to implement but we have a good portion of them there. I’m sure this won’t be a one-off for FMOD and I’ll come to learn how to use it. Pritish was the initial contact point for the audio students and set out their work for them and what we wanted. One of the weeks that we were catching up with the Ash and Chris, Pritish was away and I was going to oversee their progress and where to go from here. In the short 15 minute conversation that we had from the initial contact I got the feeling that these two really knew what they were doing, what we wanted and how to get where we all needed to be. They needed very little direction, no motivation and only a small amount of clarity. They always put their sounds in the google drive folder that we had set up for the team that everyone had access to. They delivered on time and are genuinely great blokes to work with. 100% I hope this isn’t the last time I see either of these two.

Until next time –

FeenikxFire

Nic

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2016 in Audio, C#, Game Dev

 

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Transmutation Simple Background Music

Transmutation felt so empty without any audio feedback. So I decided to put my Mulab skills to the test and create a simple background music loop.

I used the exact same process as I did when learning the tools of Mulab. I found a sound that I thought would be fitting for the 5 levels underground nuclear facility canteen setting. Created a sequence that would get me started, changed the beats per bar to 1/12th and started dabbling with different notes to see what type of pitch sound made the most sense. Dabbled with some different note compositions until I eventually finished with a simple background loop.

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I decided on the Wavework sound because it wasn’t just a single note, it had different variations within the note itself that looped for the length that the note was played. It also just seemed so fitting for a game set in a canteen 5 levels underground in a nuclear facility.

Transmutation Fadeout.JPG

 

After the sequence had ended it felt like the loop started to soon. It needed a fade out period to calm down before looping again. At the end of the sequence I created a new empty sequence just for the sake of letting the background loop sequence fade away.

 

 

 

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It’s not the worlds best track, and that’s fine, but something is better than nothing until we can start to polish up the game.

 

Until next time –

FeenikxFire

Nic

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2016 in Audio, Game Dev

 

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MuLab – My New (DAW) Friend

Hey! I made a Track!

I was speaking to an audio student and asked them what was some good software to create and mix some music in. He suggested searching for free DAW‘s (Digital Audio Workstation). I came across a site that compiled the top ten. After downloading a testing a few I felt that MuLab best catered to what I wanted to do.

It’s extremely straight forward. Find and add some sounds you like by clicking the little + button on the left. Under the compose tab – double-click to create a sequence. select the sequence then click the edit button next to the compose button. This will switch to the editing tab. Mash around on the keyboard to the left to test out notes. Then start placing them in the sequence where you would like them to go.

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There’s a lot more too it than that. But that’s a basic start anyway. Some of the things that tripped me up and caused me to spend some time figuring out was making sure a sequence was placed inside of the compose tab, otherwise when clicking the sound and going into edit, nothing shows up.

Another thing that tripped me up was figuring out the spacing and timing of sounds and sequences to make them line up, start and end when I wanted to. When creating a sequence in the compose tab. It will automatically fill the duration to be from the start loop to the end loop. Once created this can be altered by dragging the start and end point of the sequence.

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Notice that the duration length is snapping between each of the bar values? That’s because of this little bad boy right here:

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The higher that selection will change the amount of beats per bar.

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This allows you to change how many beats are in of a bar, giving you more freedom to place when sounds start and stop. The exact same process can be done inside of the edit tab.

After I figured out about the beats in a bar I was able to adjust, start and stop sounds and sequences exactly how I wanted to. My track ended up looking like this:

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New skill acquired! When it comes to making another digital game I’m sure I’ll try to make some sounds in MuLab rather than googling people other sounds. I feel like the track that I’ve made might suit a menu background. What do you think?

Until next time –

FeenikxFire

Nic

 
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Posted by on July 3, 2016 in Audio

 

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